Lydia
Şahan Kaya 24 km east of Akhisar, Lydia (TIB 14, A. Külzer, 2014)
Lydia
Koloē limnē, modern Marmara gölü, Lydia (TIB 14, A. Külzer, 2013)
Lydia
Sardis west of modern Salihli, Lydia (TIB 14, A. Külzer, 2013)
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TIB 14: Lydia

Western Asia Minor was already important in ancient times. There were numerous settlements with an enormous cultural potential and considerable economic power. In the middle ages the region was one of the central areas of the Byzantine Empire. The provinces Asia and Lydia were located there in early Byzantine times. Both provinces will be analyzed carefully by interpreting written sources, toponyms, the archaeological evidence, and the physical state of the landscape. Due to the wealth of evidence, the results will be published in several volumes.
The Byzantine Province Lydia with its important centers Thyatira (Akhisar), Sardis (Sart) and Philadelphia (Alasehir) and its main rivers Hermus (Gediz cay) and Cogamus (Alasehir cay) was adjacent to Hellespont in the North (TIB 13, Bithynia and Hellespont, by K. Belke), to Phrygia in the East (TIB 7, Phrygia and Pisidia, by K. Belke and N. Mersich) and to Asia in the South and in the West (TIB 17, Asia, by A. Külzer).




Fig. 1 Şahan Kaya 24 km east of Akhisar, Lydia (TIB 14, A. Külzer, 2014)

Fig. 2 Koloē limnē, modern Marmara gölü, Lydia (TIB 14, A. Külzer, 2013)

Fig. 3 Sardis west of modern Salihli, Lydia (TIB 14, A. Külzer, 2013)